Japan's foreign minister visits Myanmar Rohingya villages

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"Japan wants to actively support Myanmar's efforts", Kyodo quoted Kono as telling the news conference.

It noted that Taro Kono planned to meet with Aung San Suu Kyi and military leader Min Aung Hlaing as well as visit Maungdaw Township in northern Rakhine State.

On August 25, the Myanmar Army had launched a military offensive after Rohingya rebels had mounted a series of attacks on multiple government posts.

Myanmar's State Counselor and Foreign Minister Aung San Suu Kyi speaks to the media during a joint press conference with Japan's foreign minister on Friday.

Meanwhile, a total of Dollars 71.2 million was received which is 85% of the request (USD 83.7 million) from donor global bodies and countries as an initial emergency response, the UNHCR said.

Asked about the admission on Wednesday by Myanmar's military that its security forces and Buddhist villagers killed 10 captured Rohingya during clashes previous year, Suu Kyi stressed the importance of the rule of law and said the military will take responsibility.

Observers hoped the emergence of Suu Kyi's civilian government in 2016 would see the army ease up on its notorious "scorched earth" approach to rebellion and conflict.

Amnesty International has called the summary killings at Inn Din "the tip of the iceberg" in terms of atrocities carried out since August and urged a wider, impartial probe.

Joseph Tripura, a spokesman for the United Nations refugee agency UNHCR, said an investigation had been started.

The UN and USA have accused Myanmar's army of ethnic cleansing, with the UN rights chief saying it may even be guilty of genocide.

Soldiers and local residents from the majority Buddhist community had killed 10 members of the Rohingyas, a Muslim minority community, believing them to be members of the rebel Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army, according to a statement released by the commission charged with investigating the crime.

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