France has not declared war on Syria regime, says Macron

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"I assure you, we have convinced him that it is necessary to stay for the long-term", he told veteran journalists Jean-Jacques Bourdin and Edwy Plenel, charged with the two-hour grilling.

Appearing live on French television BFM and online investigative site Mediapart, the 40-year-old leader said the US, Britain and France had "full worldwide legitimacy to intervene" with the strikes, to enforce global humanitarian law.

The three allies joined forces for the missile strikes a week after a deadly attack on the town of Douma where civilians were hit with chlorine and sarin, according to the Western powers. Macron said officials helped narrow the president's focus for potential strikes after he had "gotten a little carried away over tweets", Reuters reported.

French President Emmanuel Macron and U.S. President Donald Trump attend the traditional Bastille Day military parade on the Champs-Elysees in Paris, France, July 14, 2017.

"Without declaring war against Bashar al-Assad, the joint strikes achieved their aims without leaving collateral casualties", confirmed Macron, adding that Damscus' chemical weapons capabilities have been destroyed.

Mr Macron said "we can not tolerate the normalisation of the use of chemical weapons", in a statement.

"Ten days ago, President Trump was saying the United States of America had a duty to disengage from Syria", Macron said.

He said the military operation in Syria was legitimate and within the global community framework, and was not a declaration of war.

He reaffirmed that there was proof of chemical attacks, adding: "We had reached a point where these strikes were necessary to give back the (international) community some credibility".

"We had reached a time when this attack was indispensable to restore credibility of word of global community", especially to Russian Federation, he said, and also to or key worldwide partners in any way Politics in Syria: Iran and Turkey, he stressed. "They have not used chlorine themselves but they have methodically built the worldwide community's inability to act through diplomatic channels to stop the use of chemical weapons", he said.

Despite soaring tensions with Russia, Macron stressed the need to "talk to everyone" in pursuing a Syrian settlement, saying his plans to visit Moscow in May remain unchanged.

Macron had warmer words for Turkey.

He added that he told Putin that Russian Federation was complicit in the use of chemical weapons by Syria's Assad.

Macron, criticised by the far-left and far-right and part of the conservatives over the attacks, said France, Britain and the United States had "complete global legitimacy to act".

Trump's complete lack of philosophical coherence is part of the reason Macron and U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May face fury from both their left and right for supporting Trump's air strikes.

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