Sleep in this weekend

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Sleeping for less than six hours was found to hinder the ability of study participants to perform simple tasks, regardless of whether or not they felt rested, due to a lack of focus. The adults in the study were grouped by sleep duration.

A recent study by Brigham and Women's Hospital has confirmed that sleep deprivation negatively impacts your work performance even when you do not feel exhausted. Now, a new study suggests a solution: You can actually "catch up" on the health benefits of sleep you missed during the week over the weekend.

However, the effect of not sleeping enough during the working days may be at least partially offset during the weekend. Short sleepers slept for less than five hours per night, medium sleepers about seven hours and long sleepers for nine or more hours per night.

The study found that people who sleep five hours or less per night including the weekends had higher mortality rates.

Researchers took various factors into account which affect mortality, such as gender, education, body mass index, severe disease, use of hypnotics (like sleeping pills, ) plus things like smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, coffee intake and employment status.

Sleep expert Michael Grandner explains it this way: Most people who are considered "short sleepers" are probably just shy of getting seven hours.

But the data does not show that short or long sleep is somehow responsible for higher mortality, lead author Torbjorn Akerstedt told the Washington Post.

But people who managed less than five hours each day for a week, then around six to seven hours at the weekend were no more likely to die than those who consistently slept six to seven hours a day over the same period.

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