3 things to know about net neutrality's end

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Critics of net neutrality, including the Trump administration, say such rules impeded companies' ability to adapt to a quickly evolving internet. If you want to use Facebook and Twitter?

"The gutting of net neutrality is a symbol of our broken democracy", said Evan Greer, deputy director of Fight For the Future, in a statement Monday.

Advocates argue the repeal of the Obama-era rules will promote faster internet and provide more competition.

"In 2015, the FCC stripped the FTC - the nation's premier consumer protection agency - of its authority over internet service providers".

"This was a loss for consumers and a mistake we have reversed".

FILE PHOTO: Chairman Ajit Pai speaks ahead of the vote on the repeal of so called net neutrality rules at the Federal Communications Commission in Washington, U.S., December 14, 2017. "Our transparency rule will also help ensure that any problematic conduct by Internet service providers is quickly identified and corrected".

ISPs have said they won't block or throttle legal websites, though they've left open the potential for charging more for some data delivery. If companies like Comcast and AT&T can charge more for "internet packages" the same way they charge different prices for cable TV packages, Schaub said people who are already struggling to pay their bills may suffer. They're anxious the providers will charge consumers extra to reach particular sites and services in a speedy manner, either by directly billing them or by charging companies like Netflix, which could be expected to pass on the costs to their subscribers.

Twenty-nine states have since introduced legislation, proposing reinstating some aspects of Net Neutrality. But those rules don't cover every provider in those states, just those that do business with those states' governments. "Network investment topped $1.5 trillion", he wrote. The longer-term ramifications of a world without net neutrality is what concerns proponents of a fair and open internet - issues like a threat to free flow of information and a hazard to speech rights.

Several internet providers made public pledges that they would not block or throttle sites once the rules were repealed. Under Chairman Tom Wheeler, the FCC classified broadband internet as a Title II service, putting it in line with utilities like telephone service and electricity. He spoke with Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood about what internet providers wanted to do that they couldn't under the old rules. Twenty-three attorneys general, along with various technology associations, consumer watchdogs and companies including Mozilla, are now suing to reinstate the former rules.

Perhaps the repeal won't change the direction of the internet.

Supporters of net neutrality are pushing state lawmakers to fight the repeal, but Mayer says this cannot be done at the state level. Although the direct effects of the repeal are unknown, companies will have to assess how much change consumers will tolerate, according to the Associated Press.

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