FCC's net neutrality rules are officially repealed. Here's what that really means

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The objective of the net neutrality rules has been primarily to stop discrimination from internet service providers (ISPs) against both large and small websites based on the type of content they serve.

As chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Ajit Pai spearheaded the repeal of the agency's net-neutrality rules. It's a major turning point for Internet policy and the Web as a whole, as broadband providers will enjoy additional freedom to seek new ways of making money in a rapidly changing market. The FTC can't take action unless something can clearly be proven to be "unfair or deceptive", something that's tricky to do in the net neutrality realm where anti-competitive behavior is often disguised as routine network management.

Net neutrality ended six months after the FCC voted to scrub the previous rules, despite widespread public opposition to the decision. It may also make it harder for the next generation of online services to compete if they have to pay up to be placed in a so-called internet fast lane. More than 80 percent of Americans support net neutrality, according to a University of Maryland poll released in December. Telecoms are now free to block, slow, or otherwise discriminate against online content and services.

"The gutting of net neutrality is a symbol of our broken democracy", said Evan Greer, deputy director of Fight For the Future, in a statement Monday.

Net Neutrality protections prohibited internet providers from favoring or blocking access to particular products or websites. Many ISPs seem to be concerned that any drastic move could force many of their customers to subscribe to new internet options like 5G when it rolls out later this year.

We gather here today to mark and mourn the death of net neutrality, which, despite a valient fight and 9 million comments to the FCC, officially took its last breath on Monday.at least, if you don't live in Washington state, where, as soon net neutrality died, it was immediately reborn. Supporters of net neutrality have also said that without regulation, a greater socio-economic digital divide could develop, creating a class of information "haves" and "have nots".

Pai says that by deregulating the internet service provider industry, there will now be "strong consumer protections" and that "entrepreneurs [will get] the information they need as they develop new products and services".

Net neutrality looks set to live on in piecemeal form as some USA states are enacting legislation that will require telecoms companies operating in their territories to abide by similar laws. If companies like Comcast and AT&T can charge more for "internet packages" the same way they charge different prices for cable TV packages, Schaub said people who are already struggling to pay their bills may suffer.

Critics of net neutrality, including the Trump administration, say such rules impeded companies' ability to adapt to a quickly evolving internet.

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