Fyre Festival Promoter Arrested on New Set of Fraud Charges

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According to the Associated Press, Billy McFarland was arrested Tuesday on a new set of charges related to a recent ticketing scam.

The "tickets", which were supposedly intended for events including this year's Grammys, the Super Bowl, Coachella, the Met Gala and Burning Man, were sold to 15 people and amounted to almost $100,000.

The head of New York's FBI Office, William F. Sweeney Jr. says that McFarland didn't stop committing fraud crimes after he plead guilty for the Fyre Festival incident.

McFarland is reportedly now facing a new set of charges connected to a post-Fyre Festival ticket scam.

Just when you thought it was safe, the epic millennial influencer debacle known as Fyre Festival is back in the news for, surprise, fraud.

In a complaint and affidavit released late Tuesday by U.S. Attorney's Office of the Southern District of NY, the government accuses McFarland of starting a company called NYC VIP Access, which purported to sell tickets to high-end events including the Met Gala and the Grammy Awards.

Investors in the festival scheduled for spring 2017 lost more than $26 million in what was advertised as "the cultural experience of the decade".

His lawyer, Randall Jackson, argued Tuesday that McFarland had proven he was no risk to flee by surrendering when he learned Federal Bureau of Investigation agents were looking for him.

NYC VIP Access was purporting to sell tickets to major events such as the Grammys, the Met Gala, Coachella, and the Super Bowl.

McFarland allegedly targeted Fyre Festival customers and then laundered the fraud proceeds to "others' financial accounts in an effort to hide his ownership and control of the funds". Apart from two customers who did receive tickets to the Grammy Awards - which, even then, did not not confer the level of access NYC VIP Access had claimed - no one who purchased tickets is said to have received them. He's due to be sentenced this month after pleading guilty in March. Both charges carry up a maximum of a 20 year sentence.

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