Led Yemen draft peace plan revealed to 'unite country'

Share

Warring sides in Yemen have increasingly used global aid workers as a "pawn" in the country's three-year civil war, the worldwide Committee of the Red Cross said Thursday after removing 71 employees from the country amid security concerns.

In a statement issued on Friday, Grande expressed her concern that "Up to 250,000 people could lose everything, even their lives" as a result of a possible military attack on the coastal city of Hodeidah.

Government forces have been trying to seize rebel-held Hodeida, a vital lifeline from which most of Yemen's population gets food and medicine.

A Saudi-led coalition is said to be readying for an attack on the strategic Red Sea port in an effort to recapture it from Houthi forces.

On Thursday, the International Committee of the Red Cross pulled 71 of its international staff out of Yemen, citing rising security threats.

"While the Yemen delegation has received numerous threats in the past, we can not now accept additional risk less than two months after a gunman killed a staff member", the organisation said in a statement, referring to the killing of a Lebanese employee in Yemen's southern city of Taez in April.

The ICRC relocated the majority of its worldwide staff from across Yemen to Djibouti, Marie Claire Feghali of the Red Cross told The Associated Press Friday.

The ICRC said it could only continue its operations in Yemen if it had the full agreement of all parties to the conflict.

Stillhart said: "While the Yemen delegation has received numerous threats in the past, we can not now accept additional risk less than two months after a gunman killed a staff member".

The three-year conflict has killed more than 10,000 people and displaced more than 3 million.

Noting that Yemen's most densely populated areas, Hodeidah is the single most important point of entry for the food and basic supplies needed to prevent starvation, Grande said: "Close to 70 percent of Yemen's imports, including commercial and humanitarian goods, enter through the ports of Hodeidah and Saleef".

Share