Theresa May avoids Commons defeat after Brexit climbdown

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Pro-EU Tories have warned that they remain ready to rebel if their demands are not satisfied by the compromise amendment, before leading Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg claimed their idea made a "no-deal Brexit" more likely.

Frank Field, a veteran lawmaker from the northwest of England, was his first victim after suggesting the point of the amendment Pennycook was backing was to stop Brexit, then Gareth Snell, who represents Stoke-on-Trent in the Midlands, got the same treatment for making a similar point.

"It was the Prime Minister's personal assurance that was very important to us, and she has given us that".

For Labour's part, in fact, the leadership's plans in this week's votes weaken the chances of government defeat, because their MPs are being urged to back different amendments to the Brexit legislation, rather than support the changes made in the House of Lords.

Some lawmakers tried to shout him down and accused the government of wanting too much power.

But the rebels were split, with 74 voting in favour of the Lords amendment, which called for the Government to pursue the so-called "Norway Model" membership, and 15 against it.

There is no time to get the wording of the compromise text wrong because it will probably be debated and voted on in the House of Lords on Monday, according to one senior government official.

Some of the pro-EU rebels said they had been assured by May that elements proposed by Conservative lawmaker Dominic Grieve would be brought into the European Union withdrawal bill, which will sever ties with the bloc and "copy and paste" its laws.

Britons voted 52 percent to 48 percent in favour of leaving the European Union in a June 2016 referendum.

It seems clear that no one is really sure which side - either the hard Brexiters or the hard Remainers - won the day, or what the impact of the government's supposed concession on the clause about a "meaningful vote" for MPs will be.

So it's worth remembering that while the government didn't lose any votes yesterday, Mrs May was forced into some embarrassing climb-downs that could come back to haunt her.

LONDON - Theresa May avoided defeats on key pillars of her Brexit policy after a majority of MPs voted with the United Kingdom government to defeat a number of amendments on Wednesday evening.

"There is an understanding that discussions will take place, and that could end up with a further amendment", said the government's Solicitor-General, Robert Buckland. If confirmed, the move represents a dramatic climbdown from Mrs May's original plan to offer MPs a "take it or leave it" vote to accept the withdrawal agreement or leave the European Union without a deal.

Or as some nervous Conservative Brexiteers are now calling it - "a Brexit in name only".

"We are asking members of parliament to abide by the referendum result, our manifesto commitment and to back our country", Andrew Bridgen, Conservative lawmaker and Brexit campaigner, told Reuters. "Putting a decision off doesn't make it any easier".

Remain-supporting Conservative MPs had threatened to defeat the government on an amendment known as the "meaningful vote" amendment, which would have given Parliament a wide-ranging veto to May's Brexit deal, or even bring about another referendum on whether Britain should leave the EU. This agreed backstop states that in the absence of any other solution, the North will remain in "full alignment" with the EU's single market and customs union rules.

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