Thai boys were passed "sleeping" through cave: rescue diver

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The Australian doctor made the challenging swim through the extensive network of flooded tunnels to ensure the children - none of whom had any dive training - were physically up to the 1.7km trek out. They spent nine days in darkness until two British divers found them, before their drawn-out rescue that captivated global attention.

The cave complex in Thailand's northern Chiang Rai province, where 12 boys and their football coach were trapped for more than two weeks, will be turned into a museum, BBC reported on Thursday.

Thai authorities and representatives for Musk begin discussing the possibility of using resources from Musk's companies to help rescue the boys' in the cave, including using technology from SpaceX, Tesla, or The Boring Company. Three of the five in the last group have fevers that are easing, and three have middle ear infections.

"Members of the Thai navy SEAL team, who were among the first searchers to penetrate the watery depth of Tham Luang Nang Non cave and the last divers out, flew to their base at Sattahip on the Gulf of Thailand, where they received a heroes" welcome.

The 12 Wild Boars players and their coach had entered the cave to go exploring June 23 but monsoon rains filled the tight passageways, blocking their escape.

"The situation went beyond just being a rescue mission and became a symbol of unity among mankind", he said.

Narongsak also paid tribute to former Thai SEAL diver Saman Kunan, who died in the attempt to save the boys, saying his sacrifice added to the team's determination to complete their mission.

Chiang Rai province acting Gov. Narongsak Osatanakorn lauded the cooperation between Thai and worldwide rescuers. "Everyone worked together without discrimination of race or religion as the ultimate goal was to save the youth football team". And the confidence of the diving team, and expertise specific to the cave, grew after its first successful mission Sunday. He later scraps that idea, and starts testing a "kid-size submarine" in Los Angeles to put the boys in and bring them out of the cave.

"To not receive food, we can still survive for many months, but what's necessary is water, which the cave has, and around this time there's a lot in the cave, and they chose clean water to drink", he said.

Described in a South Australia Ambulance Service statement as a "quiet and kind man" who "didn't think twice about offering his support on this mission", Harris was lauded for his work throughout the rescue effort.

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