Erdogan says U.S. set deadline for pastor's release

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"They tell us to release the priest by Wednesday 6:00 pm, otherwise the sanctions will begin", said Erdogan, adding Turkey was not a country to agree to such requests.

Trump's "jubilation in inflicting economic hardship on its North Atlantic Treaty Organisation ally Turkey is shameful", he wrote.

"Our relations with Turkey are not good at this time!" he wrote.

The White House said Mr Trump had authorised them under a section of U.S. trade law that allows for tariffs on national security grounds.

"Their currency, the Turkish lira, slides rapidly downward against our very strong dollar!"

The one-big figure sell-off in the common-currency was mainly triggered by the Financial Times (FT) report that cited that the ECB is concerned about the exposure of some European banks to Turkey's currency crisis, which led to stop losses being hit below the key 1.1508 level. "The entire Turkish public is against United States policies that disregard Turkey's legitimate security demands", Kalin, also a spokesperson for Erdogan, wrote for the pro-government Daily Sabah newspaper.

Turkey remains at loggerheads with the United States in one of the worst spats between the two North Atlantic Treaty Organisation allies in years over the detention for the last two years of American pastor Andrew Brunson and a host of other issues.

The US imposed tariffs of 25 per cent on steel and 10 per cent on aluminum in March for imports from a variety of countries. In response to Turkey's tightening embrace of Russia, Congress slapped a hold on delivery of F-35s to the Turkish air force, for fear that the Russians would be invited to examine the world's most advanced stealth warplane.

Although the pastor's arrest has soured already-fragile ties with Washington, Erdogan said there would be no let up in Brunson's case, vowing: "We have not made concessions on justice so far, and we will never make any".

"I'm not aware of any prior administration using tariffs in this way, and there's a very simple reason: because they're an incredibly blunt instrument that often can have blowback on American workers and consumers as we've seen in the China context", said Ned Price, a former Central Intelligence Agency officer who also served as a National Security Council spokesman during the Obama administration.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has rejected "threatening language" of the United States administration.

Turkey wants the United States to extradite cleric Fethullah Gulen, a Pennsylvania-based cleric who Turkish authorities say masterminded the coup attempt in which 250 people were killed.

Brunson has been detained for the past 20 months on accusations that he supported groups the Turkish government deems terrorists. Gulen denies the allegation.

He reiterated his call on citizens to change US Dollars and Euros for the Turkish Lira in the face of a sharp plunge his country's currency witnessed in financial markets this week.

"This could be the most expensive pastor in world history", Sekulow said, referring to the harm being done to Turkey's economy.

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