Eliud Kipchoge speaks after smashing Men's Marathon World Record

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The 33-year old who came eight seconds close to breaking the 2:02:57 mark at the London Marathon in 2016 ran a race against the clock nearly the entire race becoming the first man ever to run the marathon under two hours and two minutes, as he achieved a target he had longed for. Kipruto and Kipsang's times are an indication of how Kipchoge's pace blew the race apart from the outset.

'I lack the words to describe how I feel, ' said Kipchoge, who ran the second half of the race in a rapid 60min 33sec.

Kipchoge's three pacemakers were down to one by the 15km mark, but still the Olympic World Champions maintained a world record pace.

Kipchoge's run was the biggest improvement on the marathon mark since Australian Derek Clayton took nearly two and a half minutes off the record in 1967.

"Yes, it was tough running alone, but I was confident", he said. But what more it more impressive still was the fact that Kipchoge had to run the last 17 kilometres (10.5 miles) alone after his pacemakers dropped out early.

"Congratulations Eliud Kipchoge for breaking the world record at the Berlin marathon 2018.

So I want to thank everyone who has helped me", said Kipchoge, who had won in Berlin in 2015 and 2017.

New York Times in a publication on Kipchoge wrote: "Elite distance runners generally run no more than two marathons each year".

Amos Kipruto finished second in 2:06:22, with former world record holder Wilson Kipsang third in 2:06:47.

With rolling pacers, Kipchoge ran 2:00:26, but the run isn't considered a world record because of the controlled conditions.

The marathon had initially given his unofficial time as 2 hours, 1 minute and 40 seconds, then adjusted it by one second.

His split of 14:21 between the 25km and 30km mark was the fastest ever recorded in a Marathon, breaking his own previous mark set at the London Marathon in 2016 where he came close to breaking the record having covered the same distance in 1:27:13. The celebration continued with Kipchoge taking pictures and embracing fans while the next runner would cross the finish line four minutes and 44 seconds later.

On the roads he has been nearly unstoppable, winning 10 of 11 races over 26.2 miles, including Olympic gold in Rio de Janeiro and three London marathon titles.

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