Hurricane Florence Likely To Be Catastrophic For Parts of the Carolina Coast

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Gas prices on the U.S. East Coast are expected to surge this week ahead of and during Hurricane Florence's landfall, as residents have started to evacuate from the Carolinas and Virginia, for which U.S. President Donald Trump has declared that a state of emergency exists.

Forecasts generally project Florence to make landfall in southeastern North Carolina on Friday as a Category 3 or 4 hurricane.

According to the National Weather Service, Hurricane Florence remains a category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds at 130 miles-per-hour.

"A category five is 157mph or above, we certainly flirt with that before we see a little bit of weakening as we see it approaching the Carolinas coastline on Thursday, likely during the evening".

The storm, which is building up over the Atlantic, is due to make landfall in either North or SC within the next few days, and is expected to be the worst storm to hit the area in 30 years.

Her home in Hillsborough, North Carolina, is at risk for flooding, and her family and nearby relatives will ride out the storm in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Goes-East weather-monitoring satellite used its lightning mapping technology for a video showing Florence, Tropical Storm Isaac and Hurricane Helene as they traveled across the Atlantic on Tuesday.

Officials warned there was a chance of "life-threatening inundation from rising water" as the hurricane is due to hit land on Friday.

Jeff Byard of the Federal Emergency Management Agency said it was imperative locals heed the evacuation warnings.

"Sea levels have risen in most places by about 1 foot over the past century".

Florence could have devastating impacts in Virginia, including storm surges, inland flooding, downed trees and power outages, Gov. Ralph Northam said.

He says the time to flee Hurricane Florence is now.

The number of people told to evacuate in the Carolinas and Virginia has been estimated at more than 1 million, according to an NPR report. The National Hurricane Center says such massive rainfall could produce "catastrophic flash flooding and significant river flooding".

Hurricane Helene is heading north to open sea off the coast of the USA and now poses no danger to land after the storm hit cooler waters in the Atlantic. However, it is becoming more certain that Florence will bring a risky storm surge to the Carolina coast and life-threatening flooding.

To whip up a monstrous storm like the one chugging for the Carolinas you need a handful of ingredients - and Florence has them all.

North and SC and Virginia declared emergencies earlier in the week.

A total of 15-20 inches of rain is expected, with isolated areas of up to 30 inches in parts of North Carolina, Virginia and the northern part of SC through Saturday. A steady stream of vehicles filled with people and belongings is moving inland.

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