NAFTA negotiations continue with little (public) progress reported

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Canada's foreign affairs minister says Tuesday's anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the United States should serve as a reminder of the deep ties between the two countries as they haggle over the future of North American free trade.

Freeland added that to achieve a NAFTA deal, "It's going to take flexibility on all sides".

Freeland and her counterpart, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, left the bargaining table Friday without a deal.

Canada's protected dairy industry is one of three sticking points in NAFTA talks between the two countries, along with a system for settling trade disputes and cultural protections for Canadian media firms.

The in-person, high-level negotiations got back underway as events marking the 17th anniversary of the 2001 attacks took place around the US, including at the Pentagon with Vice President Mike Pence, not far from where the trade meetings are taking place.

While President Trump has promised "punitive tariffs" if a deal is not reached, Trudeau says that Canada will not bend to threats.

Speaking on C-SPAN, Perdue said USA farmers don't have the same access to Canada that Canada has to the US, specifically referring the Class 7 dairy products in Canada.

Freeland will head back to Canada for government business and to report to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau what transpired during the day's talks and where the negotiations stand.

"Both sides did a lot of thinking over the weekend, so this was a very productive meeting".

"To me, a lot of that is consistent with my suspicion that the US doesn't really want to get a deal [or] at least the [Trump] administration doesn't", he said, citing the leaked off-the-record comments Mr. Trump gave Bloomberg in late August when he said he was refusing to compromise with Canada and that any deal with Canada would be "totally on our terms".

Freeland returned to Washington on Tuesday to continue meeting with her USA counterpart. "And if we don't sign the deal, it's because no deal is actually better than a bad deal for Canada".

Wiens declined to say what action the organization would take if an updated NAFTA deal gave the US a greater chunk of the Canadian market, but did not rule out campaigning against ratification of the agreement, or the Liberal government.

The announcement by the US trade representative comes one week earlier than previously indicated. Canadian officials had said previously that they are working on the assumption that they have until the end of September to make a deal.

A member of an influential Congressional panel - and a Donald Trump supporter - said in a Canadian interview that providing American dairy farmers with more access to the Canadian market may appease the president.

Canada's dairy farmers believe they've already given enough to foreign producers in previous trade deals and aren't interested in ceding any more ground.

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