US Open: Barbora Strycova slams Serena Williams' 'Bullsh--t' meltdown

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After Ramos had to be escorted off court, Williams used her post-match press conference to suggest that men avoid such punishment for similar on-court behaviour.

Naomi Osaka's trophy presentation at the 2018 U.S. Open was odd, to say the least.

Tennis star Serena Williams was making headlines earlier this week following a clash between her and an umpire during the final match at the 2018 US Open Tennis Championships.

U.S. Tennis Association President Katrina Adams issued a statement praising Williams as a "true champion" on Saturday and told "CBS This Morning" Tuesday that she believes there is a double standard when it comes to how female and male tennis players are treated.

"Ramos is tough, one of the best umpires in the world", Strycova added. "So, I was really happy that she said that", Osaka told Ellen DeGeneres."At the time I did think they were booing at me". "I have since texted her coach to make sure she understands that she is celebrated and how proud I am of her".

But the U.S. Tennis Association and Women's Tennis Association have come out in support of Williams, which has angered the umpire community. Williams was outraged, and demanded an apology, telling Ramos that "I don't cheat to win, I'd rather lose".

A few games later, Williams received another warning, this time for smashing her racket, and that second violation automatically cost her a point, leading to more arguing.

Much of the criticism of Williams has centred on how her actions had spoiled a precious moment for Osaka, who was even moved to apologise for beating the home favourite to a NY crowd angrily booing Ramos.

However, the world's third-ranked men's player does not necessarily agree with the assessments of Williams and WTA chief executive Steve Simon that umpires treat women players differently from men.

'It is important to remember that Mr. Ramos undertook his duties as an official according to the relevant rule book and acted at all times with professionalism and integrity'.

'Rather, I think the question we have to ask ourselves is this: What is the right way to behave to honour our sport and to respect our opponents?'

On the other side of the net, though, the 20-year-old Osaka kept her cool in her first Grand Slam final to win 6-2 6-4.

"It's a delicate situation, but umpiring "a la carte" doesn't exist. Don't worry about me".

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