California Wildfires: Malibu residents reflect on Woolsey Fire

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In Northern California, the Camp Fire ripped through Butte County, killing at least 42 and becoming the deadliest in the state's history.

The California wildfires are still raging, and the situation has worsened considerably, with the death toll rising to 31 while more than 200 people are missing.

The region remains under both a "critical" and "extreme" risk Tuesday with winds of up to 60 miles per hour and gusts of more than 70 miles per hour possible, according to CNN Meteorologist Pedram Javaheri.

More harrowing footage of the California wildfires shows just how close the fires in the southern part of the state keep creeping to large urban areas.

"That's a lot of homes they have to go through to ensure that there are no human remains there, not to mention the hundreds of vehicles that are burned out and just strewn all over the roads", she said. I know we do not know each other, but I love you.

The fires have forced a quarter of a million people to flee their homes and seven evacuation shelters have been set up in Butte County, three of which are already full, according to the authorities.

At least two people have died in the Woolsey Fire, which is 20 miles long and 14 miles wide, threatening 57,000 structures.

Melissa Schuster, a member of the Paradise town council, told ABC News that the entire town "is a toxic wasteland right now".

To the south, the Woolsey Fire has burned 96,314 acres and is 35 percent contained, Cal Fire said Tuesday morning.

To the south, Woolsey Fire has blackened almost 94,000 acres and was also 30 percent contained as of Monday night, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CalFire).

President Donald Trump approved a major disaster declaration for California Monday, which will allow access to federal funding and other resources to help those affected by the fires.

In Southern California, firefighters are still working to tame the Woolsey Fire that has ravaged scenic canyons and celebrity enclaves by the Pacific Ocean.

But after several days with no information on their whereabouts, she said the family is starting to prepare for the worst.

Haynes said his home survived.

The town's mayor has estimated that 80-90% of the town's neighbourhoods were destroyed in the fire.

"We had to drive toward the smoke and fire to get away", she said.

People have been using social media to share images of their lost animals around the internet, in the hope of finding them. In some cases, investigators have found only bone fragments.

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