Gov. Scott: Election officials trying to thwart will of Florida voters

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She and the others had until 5 p.m. Thursday to get counted after receiving the provisional ballot.

Scott on Thursday night said voters "should be concerned there may be rampant fraud happening" in the two counties.

Scott sought to clarify the exact number of votes cast in Broward County.

If machine recounts are ordered, they must be completed by 3:00 p.m. November 15. Circuit Judge Carol-Lisa Phillips agreed with Scott's arguments, mandating Snipes turn over those numbers to the Scott campaign.

In court, the attorney for Broward county conceded that Broward County was under a legal obligation to produce the records, but claimed that Snipes was too busy counting ballots to comply with the law.

Congressman Matt Gaetz (R-FL) went all out on Friday during a Fox News interview amid the flap over the vote count in Broward County, FL.

On Friday morning, the Department of State informed the law enforcement agency that they have received "no allegation of criminal activity" thus far as it relates to the election.

Mr Trump told reporters "there's a lot of dishonesty" over contested votes in Broward County, but there has been no evidence of voter fraud.

Scott holds a razor-thin lead over Nelson. Florida responded with a law requiring a statewide machine recount if the final result is within half a percentage point, and a hand recount if the result is within a quarter percentage point.

Scott said he will not accept the behavior of "unethical liberals".

According to the Sun Sentinel, an unusual pattern has emerged in Broward County, where many more people voted in local races than the U.S. Senate race, when the trend is typically the reverse. He also requests Saturday's deadline to canvass ballots be extended until the legal matter is resolved.

He has previously said recounts rarely change the results of the election.

Rick Scott had appeared poised to win the Senate race against incumbent Bill Nelson on Tuesday, but his lead has narrowed significantly as votes continue to trickle in.

He also sued the state of Florida, arguing successfully that polling places should be placed on college campuses.

Various political figures beyond Scott have leveled charges against Snipes for her alleged actions.

A lawyer for Democratic U.S. Sen.

Florida Governor and Senate elect Rick Scott (left) unleashed lawsuits against Broward County and Palm Beach County while accusing Democrats of trying to steal the election.

Elias says it's "not appropriate" for a governor to suggest he's going to use his powers to "interject his law enforcement authority to prevent the counting of ballots that have been legally cast".

Scott is backed by support from the president, the GOP and Florida's current Republican Sen. Bill Nelson seems to be headed toward triggering a mandatory recount. Kemp leads Abrams with 50.3% of the vote and has claimed victory, but Abrams, who would be the first female black governor in the United States, has yet to concede, saying that some votes have not yet been counted.

In Florida, both the senate and governor's races remain undecided, and could potentially be heading for a recount.

7News cameras captured the chaotic scene after supporters of DeSantis' Democratic opponent, Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, showed up in front of the Lauderhill building to demand that every ballot is counted.

Florida voters elected Republican Ron DeSantis as governor and Republican Rick Scott as senator on election night.

Scott now leads Nelson by only 15,000 votes, well under the threshold for an automatic recount to be triggered under state law.

Nelson campaign lawyer Elias said in a conference call with reporters that making sure every vote is counted "is a feature, not flaw, of our democratic system".

Mr DeSantis is now leading by 36,000 votes.

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