Microsoft's security chief claims Internet Explorer isn't a web browser

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By the looks of things, Microsoft is just trying to pave the way for its new Chromium-based browser, despite this project still in its early days.

The reason? There's a big, lovely Internet out there, but Internet Explorer users are likely missing out on a lot of experiences that aren't tailored to the browser.

In his post, Jackson explains how Microsoft customers still ask him Internet Explorer related questions for their business. He admitted that Microsoft had stopped new web standards for Microsoft Edge and a good number of developers aren't now testing for Internet Explorer. Microsoft has made it clear that Internet Explorer is not a viable browser and the company doesn't want anything to do with it anymore.

"Internet Explorer is a compatibility solution".

In a blog post, the tech giant's cybersecurity expert Chris Jackson pleaded with users to stop using the legacy web browser, which Microsoft officially discontinued in 2015. Having one place for employees to go for their internet needs eliminates confusion around which browser to use and when.

The Verge that Microsoft helped exacerbate the problem by coupling its current web browser, Edge, with Windows 10, limiting its ability to be used on older versions of Windows. Worse, Edge isn't available on Windows 7 or 8, meaning the systems many companies rely on don't have access to Microsoft's latest browser. The new version of Edge can make a huge difference for Internet Explorer die-hard fans because businesses will be able to install it on some older versions of Windows.

We're not supporting new web standards for it and, while many sites work fine, developers by and large just aren't testing for Internet Explorer these days.

"By going with the "technical debt by default" approach, we ended up in a scenario whereby if you create a brand-new webpage today, run it in the local intranet zone, and don't add any additional markup, you will end up using a 1999 implementation of web standards by default".

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