Mobile vows not to raise prices if Sprint merger approved

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The company also reiterated its plan to use Sprint's 2.5 GHz spectrum and T-Mobile's nationwide block of 600 MHz for its 5G deployment.

"To remove any remaining doubt or concerns about New T-Mobile's prices while we are combining our networks over the next three years, T-Mobile today is submitting to the Commission a commitment that I stand behind - a commitment that New T-Mobile will make available the same or better rate plans for our services as those offered today by T-Mobile or Sprint", Legere wrote. But critics fear reduced competition will lead to higher prices and fewer choices for consumers.

T-Mobile says it plans to have "broad and deep nationwide 5G" with initial markets and the first 5G devices launching this year.

The proposed T-Mobile-Sprint merger has already received approval from the Treasury Department and is awaiting approval from the Department of Justice and the FCC.

T-Mobile said it is committed to bringing 5,600 new jobs to the industry by 2021 as well as building five new customer experience centers and expanding two current facilities. For Sprint and T-Mobile to merge into "New T-Mobile", a lot of hearts need to be won over. Such situations included potentially raising prices to pass through increased costs from taxes, fees and surcharges, or costs for services from third parties.

T-Mobile US has hired the former FCC commissioner Mignon Clyburn as an adviser in its ongoing attempt to secure regulatory approval for its planned merger with Sprint. To this, T-Mobile rebuts that if it did jack its prices up, its customers would lose faith in the company, loyal customers would leave, and it would destroy the future of the carrier.

Mignon Clyburn could make it a tad more hard to argue against the deal. "Their response-inviting government agencies to regulate their behavior-seeks to impose precisely the kind of behavioral conditions that regulators have found insufficient in merger reviews". "Rather, our merger will ensure that American consumers will pay less and get more".

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