Jury Awards $29.4 Million in Talcum-Cancer Trial

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J&J denies that its talc powder contains asbestos or is responsible for health problems.

The petitioner, Terry Leavitt, said she used Johnson's Baby Powder and Shower to Shower during the 1960s and 1970s before being diagnosed with mesothelioma in 2017.

"We will pursue an appeal because Johnson's Baby Powder does not contain asbestos or cause cancer".

A jury in Missouri a year ago awarded US$4.69 million to 22 women.

The New Jersey-based company is likely to appeal the verdict, which was made in California Superior Court in Oakland.

"Studies of more than 100,000 men and women show that talc does not cause cancer or asbestos-related disease".

Leavitt's doctors say her mesothelioma is advanced and she's not expected to live beyond 2020, according to testimony in the case. J&J has pledged to appeal cases it has lost and has convinced courts to overturn several jury verdicts so far.

A California jury has ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $29 million to a woman with mesothelioma who claimed that asbestos in the conglomerate's talcum powder products caused her cancer. "The jury verdicts are not medical, scientific or regulatory conclusions about a product", it said. "The internal J&J documents that the jury saw, once more laid bare the shocking truth of decades of cover-up, deception and concealment by J&J".

Asbestos is a term for a group of minerals often found near talc, which is widely used in cosmetics.

Leavitt's trial originally included J&J's talc supplier, Imerys Talc America, a unit of Imerys SE, as a co-defendant.

About 8 out of 10 people with mesothelioma have been exposed to asbestos.

"'They knew there was asbestos in it, and for me that's the worst part because they failed to warn the consumer", said Kate Alessandri, an Oakland librarian.

A court in the U.S. state of California ordered Johnson & Johnson to compensate a woman to the tune of $29 million for cancer complications she developed from using the company's talcum powder, according to media reports. The jury did not award punitive damages - created to punish defendants - from Johnson & Johnson and the other companies involved in making the talcum powder.

The company cited "serious procedural and evidentiary errors" and said it has already moved for a mistrial on eight points. Before that, in 2016, the company was ordered to pay $55 million to a woman who claimed she got cancer from its talcum powder.

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