Adani's Carmichael coal mine gets all-clear from Federal Government

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"Following this independent assessment and the Department of Environment and Energy's recommendation for approval, I have accepted the scientific advice and therefore approved the groundwater management plans", Price said in a statement.

Environment minister Melissa Price announced that she had approved the groundwater management plans after CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) and Geoscience Australia found they met scientific requirements.

Queensland Environment Minister Leeanne Enoch says her department will consider whether the groundwater plan identifies the Doongmabulla Springs Complex as a water source, among other things.

"It is wrong to think Adani now has the green light start digging up coal in the Galilee Basin".

However, Price reiterated it will ultimately be up to the Queensland pollies to greenlight nine remaining environmental plans.

"The Project now requires further approvals from the Queensland Government prior to construction commencing".

It had "been subject to the most rigorous approval process of any mining project in Australia", she said. "Now we need the state Labor government to stop dragging their heels and get on with the job of creating these jobs".

Labor would "adhere to the law" and be "guided by the science", he said.

"Of course we will watch with interest to see the State Government go through its final processes and we look forward to welcoming the jobs for our community", Cr Strelow said.

"When it comes to making these decisions, they'll be made by ministers listening to scientists, not senators listening to themselves".

Slattery said that if Price had been pressured to rush through the approval ahead of the election, the decision might be open to legal challenge. Demonstrations were also held against the proposed coal mine.

GetUp said there would be a backlash against the decision.

Adani hopes to take up to 12.5 billion litres of water - 5000 Olympic-sized swimming pools - from the Suttor River in central Queensland, a river that floods and dries up at different times and on which farmers and wetlands rely.

Federal Opposition Leader Bill Shorten suggested the approval was suspect, saying "maybe the government's chose to rush the decision out on Adani so they don't have to talk about a bigger problem that they have created on their own".

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