Chicago prosecutor Kim Foxx’s texts revealed her frustration over Jussie Smollett’s case

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The messages were among almost 200 pages of screenshots of texts exchanged between Foxx and her top staff, included alongside more than 3,600 pages of emails - and a 36-page spreadsheet detailing records the office determined could not be released to the public because records in Smollett's case were sealed the day the charges were dropped.

"After reviewing all of the facts and circumstances of the case, including Mr. Smollett's volunteer service in the community and agreement to forfeit his bond to the City of Chicago, we believe this outcome is a just disposition and appropriate resolution to this case", the Cook County State's Attorney's office stated in an email at the time.

Foxx had recused herself from the case in February after she had communications with one of Smollett's relatives.

In an op-ed for The Chicago Tribune, Foxx said she understood the public outrage against Smollett, but said it was important to separate people we were angry at, from people who pose a public safety threat.

"(A pedophile) with 4 victims 10 counts.

Smollett, who is African-American and openly gay, had been indicted on 16 counts of disorderly conduct on charges he staged a hate crime attack on himself. It also lays out Foxx's reasons for dropping the charges, noting, "Just because we can charge something doesn't mean we should".

"I agree and absolutely stand by the decision made", Lanier replied. "16 counts on a class 4 becomes exhibit A", Foxx wrote at the start of the exchange. "It's the right decision".

In addition, it appeared the prosecutors' office notified Chicago police only moments before the charges were dropped as reporters were already gathering in the courtroom - tipped off by a publicist for Smollett's legal team.

(Nuccio DiNuzzo/Getty Images) Jussie Smollett waves as he follows his attorney after his court appearance at Leighton Courthouse on March 26, 2019 in Chicago.

Johnson, though, was furious over the decision and publicly blasted it - along with Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

Foxx texted back and apparently compared the Smollett case to the sex abuse charges against singer R. Kelly.

In a written statement released Tuesday night, Foxx said she only wanted to ensure that the office's charging practices were consistent across different cases.

Foxx has faced mounting pressure to explain in more detail why the prosecution of Smollett was so quickly abandoned. Each of the 16 counts against him covers various alleged acts that Smollett falsely described to the officers-including that he was hit by two men, that they yelled racial and homophobic slurs and poured a chemical on him.

Her office declined to comment on the specifics of the case, citing an ongoing review.

At her request, Cook County Inspector General Patrick Blanchard agreed last week to investigate the office's handling of the Smollett case.

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