SpaceX`s Falcon Heavy conducts first commercial flight

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Falcon Heavy is created to launch large commercial payloads into high orbits, take on heavy-duty national security missions and potentially power interplanetary missions as well.

To facilitate this, the two side boosters will attempt to land back at SpaceX's Landing Zones 1 and 2 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, while the center core will attempt to land on the Of Course I Still Love You drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean.

The first Falcon Heavy's central core missed its landing at the end of last year's mission, due to the fact that it ran out of ignition fluid before the final engine burn.

At 34 minutes after takeoff, the Arabsat-6A satellite was deployed to orbit in what was the Falcon Heavy's first commercial mission. As usual, the live stream will include commentary from SpaceX staff, along with details about the mission and status of the spacecraft.

SpaceX has several paying customers committed to flying on Falcon Heavy, including Inmarsat, Viastat and Arabsat, according to its launch manifest.

Introducing a new ultra-powerful rocket has allowed SpaceX to compete directly with arch rival United Launch Alliance, a joint venture between Lockheed Martin and Boeing, for lucrative government contracts that require heavy-lift launch vehicles. "Three for three boosters today on Falcon Heavy, what an incredible accomplishment". It's nearly certainly still in orbit around the sun with a mannequin at the wheel.

"The Falcons have landed", Musk said in a tweet that included pictures of all three boosters.

SpaceX typically launches Falcon 9 rockets.

NASA's Saturn V rockets, used for the Apollo moon shots, are the all-time launch leaders so far in size and might.

The satellite aims to provide communications to people in the Middle East, Africa, and Europe.

That was back when SpaceX was still expected to test Falcon Heavy later that same year.

Though Falcon Heavy's inaugural launch ultimately went off without a hitch, SpaceX will now have to repeat that success with the added risk of carrying a multimillion dollar satellite. Although SpaceX has made "many good design improvements" from the rocket that launched 14 months ago, Musk said there is a 5 to 10 percent chance of failure with this mission.

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