Brexit Party Peterborough by-election candidate Mike Green in awkward Radio 4 interview

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EU laws are put in place by heads of member states and MEPs, who approve, disapprove or amend proposed legislation from the European Commission.

While the poll found that the Brexit Party would hammer the Conservatives, it forecasted that Jeremy Corbyn's Labour Party would win a general election, taking about 27% of the vote. Priti Patel, a former Cabinet Minister who is critical of the withdrawal agreement as it stands, labelled the campaign "desperate" and "appalling" and an attempt to undermine Prime Minister Theresa May's critics.

However, it has not been good news for Britain's main political parties, for whom recent local elections results have already sent a grim warning of public discontent.

"Polls show his Brexit Party easily winning next week's European Parliament polls and edging ahead of Theresa May's Conservatives in a United Kingdom general election", reports Yahoo News.

Labour is in second place on 21% and the pro-European Liberal Democrats third with 12%.

Two parties which support staying in the European Union, the Liberal Democrats and the Greens, were on 15 per cent and 11 per cent respectively.

"The public will blame the Conservative government because we were the party that brought forward the referendum", Mr Merriman, who backs a second referendum, told BBC Radio 4's Westminster Hour on Sunday night.

"There are only two forces that can win this election - that nasty nationalism of the Farage Brexit Party, or the tolerant, compassionate outward-looking patriotism of the Labour Party", he will say. Last week, Sir Graham Brady, the chair of the influential Conservative backbench 1922 committee, told the BBC that he expected the Prime Minister to set a date for her departure this week. Ms.

Nigel Farage's Brexit Party would be able to secure more votes in a general election than the governing Conservative Party, a new poll has concluded. May, while pledging to step down ahead of the next phase of Brexit negotiations, is yet to mention a date.

Last month Jeremy Corbyn saw off an attempt to commit the party to a confirmatory referendum on any Brexit deal, and Labour will instead only back a fresh vote only if it can not either win the changes it wants to Mrs May's deal or secure a general election. Some within the party believe that should the government concede to some of its key demands - particularly around remaining in a customs union with the EU - a confirmatory vote or a second referendum would not be necessary.

At the heart of the talks between Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May has been the idea that some kind of customs union could be included in a compromise deal between the two leaders. Others are adamant that such a vote must be the feature of any deal. "We are aware that there is a de-alignment in politics".

"And so for those that didn't want it and wanted Remain, they'll blame us for having tried to take us out".

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