Boeing May deliveries fall by 56%, Max 737 grounding howls holocaust

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The Max 737, described as the most environmentally friendly and fuel efficient in the family of the Boeing 737, was grounded following the Ethiopian Airline's crash from Addis Ababa to Nairobi, Kenya in April.

"We would like to sincerely apologise for the inconvenience caused", the airline said.

While the FAA is "under a lot of pressure", he said the Max will be returned to service "when we believe it will be safe", following reviews of the design, flight testing, and other checks.

Cork Airport managing director Niall MacCarthy said he regretted the grounding of Norwegian's aircraft.

Global airlines that had rushed to buy the fuel-efficient, longer-range aircraft have since canceled flights and scrambled to cover routes that were previously flown by the MAX.

Boeing Co's troubled 737 MAX aircraft, which has been grounded since March following two fatal crashes in five months, will be back in the air by December, Bloomberg reported here on Wednesday, citing a top Federal Aviation Administration safety official.

On Sunday, the airline extended cancellations of about 115 daily flights until September 3, but Parker said that decision merely reflected monthly scheduling plans for pilots and flight attendants.

United Continental Holdings Inc. has removed the Max from its flight schedule through August 3, while Southwest, the biggest Max operator, has set August 5 for its return.

An aerial photo shows Boeing 737 MAX airplanes parked at the Boeing Factory in Renton, Wash., on March 21, 2019.

Once regulators approve the MAX, airlines will need some time to train pilots on the software fix, meant to prevent the erroneous triggering of a system called MCAS that played a role in the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines crashes, and to prepare the jets following months of storage.

"We'd like to get it flying again so when customers get on it, they realize it's been flying potentially for weeks", said Ross Feinstein, a spokesman for American.

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