S. Korea hardest hit by N. Korea's cyberattacks

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An earlier United Nations report attributed several major cyberattacks on banks and crypto exchanges to the North Korean regime, with the funds then being used to fund their nuclear program.

The United Nations is investigating 35 North Korean cyberattacks across 17 countries, according to a report published August 13 by Associated Press. Thirteen nations suffered one attack each, listed in the report as: Costa Rica, Gambia, Guatemala, Kuwait, Liberia, Malaysia, Malta, Nigeria, Poland, Slovenia, South Africa, Tunisia and Vietnam.

The experts noted in the report that implementing North Korea's increasingly sophisticated attacks "is low risk and high yield", and often requires just a laptop computer and internet access. According to the SCMP there have been at least 35 incursions in 17 countries.

Some of the most audacious hacks have been on the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT) system.

A number of cryptocurrency exchanges in the region have been attacked this year including Binance, Tokyo based BitPoint, and Singapore based Bitrue. Another known method is by crypto mining activities for funding professional military branches. And they said they are also waiting for a response from Uganda "to multiple inquires" about reports indicating specialized training is being conducted in the country, and KOMID and North Korean workers maintain a presence. Another hack installed malware on an entire nations ATM system resulting in 10,000 fraudulent cash distributions across 20 countries. In Chile, hackers used LinkedIn to "headhunt" an employee of the Chilean interbank network connecting all of the countries ATMs.

Most recently, ZDNet reported that the US Department of Justice has formally charged a North Korean programmer for the WannaCry ransomware outbreak in addition to several other prominent cyber attacks.

South Korean cryptocurrency exchange Bithumb was reportedly attacked at least four times, leading to a cumulative loss of over $50 million. It identified one instance where malware was used to mine Monero and send the mined tokens to servers at Kim Il Sung University in Pyongyang.

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